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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the ambassador who was killed on the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi two nights ago. christopher stevens was an arabic speaker, a longtime student of libya. he had lived in the kuchb country on and off for a long time. he understood the country well. in 2008 he wrote what in retrospect now seems to be an important and chilling memo about this particular place in libya. see, we'll show you. this is where libya is on the map of north africa. see libya sort of juts into the mediterranean at two different points, on the west side and on the east side. on the western side there, you see is tripoli. that is the capital of libya. but it is way over on the other peninsula on the right on the eastern part of the country where the city of benghazi is located. this place that christopher stevens, our ambassador who was just killed, the place he wrote about in 2008 in this cable that was uncovered by wikileaks, it's right there next to benghazi, the city of derna. in order to understand how it is we just had an ambassador murdered, it's worth knowing what the ambassador had to say about this flas pl
killed in tuesday's attack in benghazi, libya. meantime angry protests spread today throughout the muslim world including jerusalem and the west bank along gaza. u.n. peacekeepers were also attacked by protesters. no casualties reported. in tunisia protesters stormed the u.s. embassy setting fires and battling with tunisian security forces. two people were killed. another 29 injured. in all protests broke out today in at least 17 nations from north africa across the middle east to indonesia. all the demonstrators voicing outrage against that film made in the united states that ridicules the prophet mohammed. nbc's jim maceda is in that country. we hope to have him join us later. joining me now, andrea mitchell, most of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea i'll start off with you. the ceremony you were talking about when bodies were returned after the attacks on the embassy in 1998 you were there. this is something that many people in my generation never witnessed and never seen in our lifetimes. an ambassador his remains and those of his colleagues brought back in this country. >> it is the
are in custody in benghazi. they're being indirectly linked to the rocket attack on the u.s. consulate. i want to talk to jimana in tripoli, the libyan capital west of benghazi. first of all, what do we know about those arrested? >> very little, suzanne, so far. what we understand from libyan officials is that at least one of those arrested is a -- they were detained in benghazi yesterday. we know they are being interrogated to see what role they had in the attack, but according to one sore libyan official today, they may not have been directly linked to the attack. they may have ties to the extremist organization that carried out the attack. they have not been charged yet. they are detained and being intrargted acorked to libyan officials, so we should be knowing about this as information is released by the libyan government. >> do we believe these people are really responsible for what took place, or does this look like this is more kind of a show? >> well, quite frankly, suzanne, the libyan government here is under a lot of pressure when it comes to this. not only from the united states, bu
cocktails. the protests follow tuesday night's storming of the was consulate in the libyan city of benghazi that left the u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three staffers dead. on wednesday, president obama vowed to bring to justice those responsible for the killings, which he said would not repeat ties between u.s. and libya. >> we reject all efforts to denigrate the religious beliefs of others, but there is absolutely no justification to this type of senseless violence. none. the world must stand at a to unequivocally reject these brutal acts. already, many libyans have joined us in doing so. this attack will not break the bonds between u.s. and libya. >> the obama administration has dispatched an elite group of marines to the libyan capital of tripoli and six u.s. warships toward the libyan coast in a bid to ramp up security of u.s. personnel. we'll have more on the protests throughout the middle east after the headlines. the response to the deadly attack in libya has entered the presidential campaign after republican nominee mitt romney is the tragedy to attack president obama. ho
.s. consulate in benghazi killing four americans including thu.s. ambassador. the situation not calming down at all since then. thousands taking to the streets in cairo today near the u.s. embassy there. that country's president vows to protect american personnel. meantime yemen's president ordering an investigation into today's storming of the u.s. embassy in the capital city of sanaa. hundreds of rioters scaling that building there, setting fire to cars, tearing down and burning the american flag as well. greg palkot is following all of the breaking developments live from london. to yemen first, greg, what is the latest there? >> reporter: jon we've been to that embassy a few times. it is pretty well-fortified and pretty secure yet another u.s. embassy that has been targeted and targeted today it was. hundreds of protesters managed to scale the perimeter walls, break through the main gate and enter the security building in front of the compound of the embassy. they smashed windows and torched cars. security guards shot into the air. they were outnumbered. yemen security came in and fired b
leadership. that's the spirit that sets us apart from other nations. this was their work benghazi and this is the work we will carry on. >> president obama today talking of the mission that so many americans do and what four americans died doing. we put them front and center tonight. ambassador christopher stevens, sean smith, glen doherty and tyrone woods. joining me on the phone is ambassador stevens' stepfather. i am so sorry for your loss and please extend our condolences to your entire family. what do you want people to know about your stepson? >> well, i think what you learn today, it tells me what his legacy was at the anderson air force base when the caskets were brought back, 800 members of the state department were there and the president for the first time he spoke at one of these ceremonial dignified transfers and secretary clinton spoke and they all expressed the understanding that chris's commitment to libya and to the country has left a legacy that will live after him. so this is what i'd like people to know, that he was beloved by his colleagues in the state depart
in a bid to prevent violence. in another some 30,000 libyans march 234d benghazi in a demonstration against islamic extremists. the crowds mourn the death of christopher stevens last week and demanded that a large militant group ansar al shariya dispanned and called for libyan's interim government to improve security. for more, i'm joined by shibley telhami, the anwar sadat professor of peace and development at the university of maryland. and lawrence pintak, dean of the edward r. murrow school of journalism at washington state university, and a former middle east correspondent for cbs news who's written widely on media in the middle east. shibley telhami, a piece of this unrest clearly seems to involve very different understandings of the notion of free speech and responsibility. what do you see? >> i... first i done think it's really about free speech. i know free speech is important and there's no question that in arab, in muslim countries's understanding the nature of free speech in the west is difficult n part because clearly they haven't experienced the kind of democracies, including
helped save from destruction? >> as the libyan president flew to benghazi to visit the destroyed consulate today, he said he deeply regretted the loss of life. >> we're doing our best to bring them to justice. >> the attack showed he does not have complete control of his country. in cairo where the united states turned its back on its old friend hosni mubarak, radicals are troying to destroy the embassy with running battles with riot police in tahrir square, tear gas and stones. it's ironic that with american diplomats inside the embassy who helped to give these demonstrators, these protestors a voice and allowed them to actually carry out this anti-american clashes that we're seeing right now. so what did washington think would happen if he won? as the new egyptian president morsi was campaigning to lead the world's biggest arab country in elections the u.s. supported, he used radical creatures to stump for him. >> without a doubt he doesn't support the violence. >> ed hussein, a former muslim extremist is now with the council on foreign relations. >> what motivates them is the
of this to include benghazi was preplanned. it's not spontaneous. megyn: so you're saying they are feeling more emboldened now, that they don't believe that the american superpower will strike back in the way we once would have? >> exactly. and, of course, our ability to do so isdiminished every time we pull more troops occupant of a place like afghanistan t. out of a place like afghanistan. the sad fact of it is that the mission of the u.s. u.s. marinen this case with the fast units being sent out are to protect diplomatic missions from this kind of assault. well, there's not quite enough marines to go around if that's what we're going to continue to do, cutting the budget. so places like sudan which turned down the introduction of a marine security guard detachment and the enhanced fast unit that was supposed to go out there, what we really ought to be doing is telling sudan no marines, no aid. and this administration isn't about to do that kind of thing because they can't even acknowledge that they failed, they failed in the basic requirements of preparing for the kind of demonstrations that
at the benghazi consulate?" you pick up "the new york times" and you get a blow-by-blow description of what supposedly went o. so it was like pulling teeth to get information yesterday. a lot of senators were frustrated. and you pick up major newspapers in the country and you find details not shared with you. and one of the things i'm worried about is we're trying to find out who committed these terrible acts of terrorism -- and they were acts of terrorism, not a spontaneous riot -- i said, what is the game plan? will they be held as enemy exatents, are they going to be held as common criminals? will they be prosecuted in libya? will they be brought back to the united states? do you have to read them their miranda rights? really absolutely not a whole lot of information. but at the end of the day, it was a lost opportunity i think to inform the congress. can we now move to the rand paul amendment? mr. mccain: mr. president, i'd like to take what remaining time we have in order to discuss the paul amendment. and i'd like to begin by asking insertion in the -- in the "congressional record" a
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)